What to wear for your family photoshoot




The most common and obvious question that I get asked by my clients is What to wear.

Well, dressing yourself in the morning is hard enough when you don’t have to stand in front of a camera and be your best self. Choosing what to wear for a photoshoot can trigger even the most confident, farshun-ey fashionista to pull their entire wardrobe out onto the floor in search of the perfect outfit.


So if your nerves start to fiz when you think about what to wear, don’t worry. This is SO

normal! Before you lose sleep to late nights spent online shopping--putting articles of

clothing in your cart only to take them out again--let’s talk about what works and what doesn’t. Number one thing I want you to remember? Being comfortable is EVERYTHING. You should look and feel like yourself, first and foremost.


Clothing for your family. It is very important to have outfits that are well coordinated. Try to avoid all whites, jeans and white tops for everybody, or same exact colored outfits for everyone. The best thing is to color coordinate and complement, but not match each other. Pastel colors work always well for any sessions. Please have a look at the sample photos that I have attached . A rule of thumb here is to choose to either complement each other’s outfit or to contrast it. BE CAREFUL WITH PATTERN & PRINTS. Avoid large bold patterns as they often dominate the photograph and detract attention from your beautiful face. Usually, subtle smaller patterns work best. Flannels or a light floral print are great when they complement the location. But less is definitely more with this one, try to limit yourself to one pattern at a time. it’s best to keep your colour scheme limited to four colours. You can choose one person to wear a feature colour and have everyone else’s outfits complement that. The colour wheel is a great reference point when trying to figure out what colours look a bit weird together and what colours are a match made in heaven. Much like crazy patterns, clothing with writing or logos on it tends to be a bit distracting. We’re not getting paid for Adidas’ not- so-subtle product placement. However, if the logo or phrase is tasteful (read: not tacky), in theme with the shoot, and fits your personality, I’m all for it.

L E A D W I T H P E R S O N A L I T Y .


I’m up for it all. If you’re in a heavy metal band and want to smash some things and

scream at the sky, throw on your best concert attire and count me in. If you’re a drama kid at heart and live for the spotlight, I’ll help you turn your front porch into a stage and feed you the lines you’ve forgotten. If you’re a jeans and a t-shirt kinda person, let’s work

with that. I want your shoot to be different from

everyone else’s. I want it to be you.


I N C O R P O R A T E

T E X T U R E & MOVEMENT


Pick fabrics that move and flow with you. Ones that add a cosy texture, or get picked

up by the wind, filter the late afternoon sun, and glow in the morning light. Natural

fibres like linen, cotton, or wool are amazing. Avoid stiff-seeming garments with

collars as they look a bit too formal and often get tucked In weird spots and need

adjusting.

Aim for neutrals, earthy tones, and metallics. These colours compliment the outdoor environment almost anywhere you go and look damn fine as a printed, framed photograph. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not advocating for a beige world of

quiet and inoffensive colours. By neutrals, I just mean softer tones. Primary colours are incredibly striking, but can sometimes have the effect of detracting from the main

subject (which is you). So for example, instead of electric blue, go for something closer to sky blue. Instead of bright orange, opt for ochre or apricot. A rule of thumb here is to choose to either complement your natural environment or contrast it. A mustard dress in a deep green forest will look epic, whereas a bright pink, patterned

dress doesn’t really fit in with your surroundings. It totally depends on what you’re looking for! For families it’s best to keep your

colour scheme limited to four colours. You can choose one person to wear a feature colour and have everyone else’s outfits

complement that.

LAYER UP! Wearing layers is great form (and function). Not only does combining layers and textures create more visually interesting photograph Think jackets, cardigans, hats, scarves, tights, and headbands. Hats, sunglasses, socks, and jackets are a great way to jazz up your accessory game. Throw some fun extras into your bag but avoid large distracting pieces.




C O L O U R S C H E M I N G .



Aim for neutrals, earthy tones, and metallics. These colours compliment the outdoor environment almost anywhere you go and look damn fine as a printed, framed photograph.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not advocating for a beige world of quiet and inoffensive colours. By neutrals, I just mean softer tones. Primary colours are incredibly striking, but can sometimes have the effect of detracting from the main subject (which is you). So for example, instead of electric blue, go for something closer to sky blue. Instead of bright orange, opt for ochre or apricot. A rule of thumb here is to choose to either complement your natural environment or contrast it. A mustard dress in a deep green forest will look epic, whereas a bright pink, patterned dress doesn’t really fit in with your surroundings. It totally depends on what you’re looking for!

For families it’s best to keep your colour scheme limited to four colours. You can choose one person to wear a feature colour and have everyone else’s outfits complement that.


TIP: Refer to a colour wheel! It is a great reference point when trying to figure out what colours look a bit weird together and what colours are a match made in heaven. Watches are a bit of a weird one, especially in couple’s shoots. The big fat circle face of a watch is particularly apparent when people are holding each other’s faces and bringing them in for some sugar. Best to leave the watch at home unless its sentimental. And finally shoes. You can’t have come this far, painstakingly planning your outfit, only to stop at your ankles. Shoes are a key part of a look and ideally complement the rest of the outfit. Always consider context when choosing footwear for both aesthetic appeal and practicality. And lastly, the main thing is to remember about your clothes : Your clothes should be comfy on the first place and match your personality. So let’s work with that. I want your shoot to be different from everyone else’s. I want it to be you.

Hair and Makeup Don’t forget about your hair, makeup and nails. Get your nails and toes ready for the shoot. Fix your hair nicely, maybe some light curls. Do your makeup! Put a little more than what you normally would as usually the pictures tend to not reflect the makeup. So LETS RECAP: Dress for the season. Dress for the location. Compliment - don’t match (unintentionally). Wear something comfortable that you feel like yourself in. Natural fibres and earthy colours look amazing in most settings. Avoid large prints, logos, and patterns (unless it helps tell your story).



Refer to colour wheel when choosing clothes for all family in order to coordinate.



Layer up!


Throw some accessories like a hat or denim jacket into your bag. Choose your shoes according to your clothes. Do your hair and makeup. Last but not least, DON'T STRESS. I know it's difficult, especially if you don't like to be in front of the camera. Don’t worry, all will be just fine. I will do my best to make you and your family feel comfortable and remember, you made a great decision to do your family photo session, as you will have a great memory keepsake for your and your child's lifetime. Just relax! :)